Birds

American Robins

American Robins are common to abundant residents in most of the state of Georgia.  They generally preside in a assortment of short grass habitats in residential areas, farmyards, parks, and pastures, and are less common on the coastal plane and coast. American Robins spend their winters in moist bottomland forests. The song is a caroling series of sing songy phrases rising and falling in pitch cheerup cherrily cheerily, along with a horse like whinny and rapid tutt tutt tutt alarm notes.

Listen: http://youtu.be/98DFgHAe-Qw

-Holly

-Holly

Barred Owls

Barred Owls are common permanent residents across the entire state.  They are mainly found in wet or moist bottomland hardwood forests. A slurred rhythm of who cooks for you, who cooks for you’all is often interspersed with a little short whoo ha along with rumpus caterwauling.

Listen: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fppKGJD3Y6c

Carolina Chickadees

Carolina Chickadees are common permanent residents across the state, and live in forests of many types and residential areas.  Their song consists of a four-part clear whistle febe febay and high-pitched rapid chickadee dee dee dee dee.  Winter call notes are high and thin.

Listen: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o3z0XxQpI7o

Carolina Wren 

Carolina Wren is a common resident of the entire state living in dense shrubby tangles and woodlands near residential areas.  Its song is loud and ringing, repeating variations of tea kettle tea kettle tea kettle.  Alarm notes include chatters like rubbing the teeth on a metal comb, staccato notes and scolding churs.

Listen: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ry-koSHRdZs

Mourning Doves

Mourning Doves are common to abundant statewide, especially in residential areas with trees, shrubs, open fields, lawns or roadsides, and farms.  They are named after their melancholy cooing, of five notes, the second higher pitched followed by three repeated notes coo ooo whoo whoo.

Listen: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7oNljd7R1f8

Northern Cardinals

Northern Cardinals are common to abundant permanent residents to the entire state living in nearly all forest types and primarily shrubby residential areas.  Their song is a variety of long repeated phrases usually of two notes perty perty perty or watcheer watcheer watcheer.  Their call note is similar to two coins hitting each other.

Listen: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3pNQ3as6wDM

By AS & MP

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